Acromio-Clavicular Joint Injury

The acromio-clavicular joint, or ACJ, is located on the top of your shoulder. Injuries to this joint can lead to restricted and painful movement. If left untreated, postural changes and abnormal movement habits can occur, increasing the likelihood of secondary problems. The ACJ is formed by the end of your collar bone, or clavicle, and the acromion process; a bony bump at the top of your shoulder blade, or scapula.

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Concussion Updates

Recently I attended a seminar held by Sports Medicine Australia regarding the most updated understanding of concussion management. Although a lot of the scientific understanding is improving with concussion, the more the medical community learns about concussion, the more we realize how little we have previously known regarding how to manage this common complaint.

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Hypermobility

What is hypermobility? Hypermobility is defined as having an unusually or abnormally large range of movement in a joint or joints. It is effectively the opposite of stiffness (hypomobility). A lot of people come to see us because of stiffness, so the thought of hypermobility may sound pretty good, but it comes with it's own host of challenges. Too much movement can be just as problematic as not enough movement!

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What is a bulging Disc?

Most people know that their back has discs, but what and where they are is often missed! Our spine is made up of 33 vertebrae which run from the tail bone to the top of the neck. Each vertebrae is shaped differently to allow for different movements. These regions all work together to help us to move in our daily lives. Like all the other joints in our body, each vertebrae is strongly wrapped in a complex system of soft tissues such as ligaments, tendons and muscles. In addition to all these structures, there is an intervertebral disc which sits in between each vertebrae.

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Concussion Part Two: I think I have a concussion, now what?

In the first part we learnt what a concussion was, in this part we will tell you how to treat yourself in the first 24hours to a week and beyond, and how your local Osteopath can help. The first rule of a concussion is: if in any doubt or any unusual symptoms appear head to the emergency room at a hospital or to your local general practitioner as soon as possible. This may involve an ambulance, but you can always call Nurse On Call on 1300 60 60 24 to check, which is available 24/7. Due to the neurological impact of a concussion the first thing to do is to limit sensory inputs such as light, sound and proprioception or reaction time. Take the patient to a dimly lit room, with minimal noise (no TV, or lots of talking) and lay them down with a slightly elevated head.

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Concussions: What are they?

You have heard the term, know the stories, heard the warnings and seen them occur on the sporting field, but what actually is a concussion? Concussions are defined as a brain injury caused by a blow to the head or a violent shaking of the head and/or body. This does not mean you need to lose consciousness for a concussion to occur. The initial injury itself is to the brain and is due to the brain being pushed against the inside of the skull, some describe it as a bruising of the brain due to the impact. As well as the impact force, different speeds in which the different parts of the brain move can stretch and tear tissue due to the shearing force which can also injure the nerve tissue.

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